I am on a quest to minimize the amount of paper I use.  This quest serves two purposes: save the environment and save my sanity.  I have worked hard this year to move the majority of my records to an online system or an app.  Today I'd like to share an app I have recently integrated to help me track my students' reading levels, running records and Benchmark assessments.

Levelbook is a great app to organize your reading records!
(All sparkly clip art from Glitter Meets Glue.)

The Levelbook app is very easy to use.  I discovered it late in the year, and integrated it right away.  I will share the process with you using a "test class".

First, add your students.  You will be prompted to put in their reading level.  In the fall, I will use the level from students' end of the year first grade Benchmark assessment.  (You can also select other assessments: DRA, Lexile, PM Reader, Reading Recovery, Reading A-Z.) 

Levelbook is a great app to organize your reading records!

After all students are added, select the student you would like to test.  I selected the Benchmark assessment, so the book choices for that assessment are displayed.

Levelbook is a great app to organize your reading records!

After you select your book, you can record the student reading.  (Great for double checking later!)  At the end of the reading, the words per minute are calculated automatically.  You can track errors by tapping "flag error".  This will allow the accuracy rate to be determined automatically at the end of the reading.

Levelbook is a great app to organize your reading records!

If the student corrects the error, you can tap the designated place to show the self-correction.  At the end of the reading, the app will calculate the self-correction ratio along with the words per minute and accuracy.

Levelbook is a great app to organize your reading records!

I still mark a running record by hand.  I have found that I prefer not to mark errors with a screen tap because it may be too obvious to the students what I am doing.  Instead, I manually add in the number of errors and self-corrections at the end.   (Accuracy and self-correction ratio are still determined automatically.)  After completing the running record, there is also a place to add the comprehension score.

Levelbook is a great app to organize your reading records!

At the end of the test, you can view students' stores at a glance by clicking on their name.  When you do this, all testing data for the student will be displayed.  If you have given multiple assessments to the same student, you will be able to see them at a glance.  (Tapping the edit button will display the screen seen above.)

Levelbook is a great app to organize your reading records!

Other features I love about this app.
*You can easily add notes to each record.
*You can add photos to the record.  I always take a picture of the running record so everything is in one    place.
*You can sort students by first name, last name, date of assessment, or level (great for grouping).
*You can add additional books for running records between formal assessments.
  If you choose to add your own books, the only extra step is to get a word count.  You can make the
  reading as long or as short as you would like.  Once the book is added, it will automatically appear
  on your choice list.  I plan on adding multiple books, so next year my running records will be ready
  to go from day one.

Levelbook is a great app to organize your reading records!

The Levelbook is a little on the expensive side at $9.99.  However, it is well worth it in my opinion.  It's so nice to have all of my records in one place instead of hunting through student folders and conference binders (not to mention the time and money I save on folders, binders, paper, etc.)

How do you like to manage your running records?

Thank you, and have a great week!

We are in the midst of our fairy tale unit, and the students and I are having a ball discovering new versions of classic fairy tales!

Five Awesome fractured fairy tales and how to use them in your classroom

There are loads of different versions of fairy tales out there.  This year, I have really worked on familiarizing myself with new titles as well as incorporating some that I used when I taught intermediate grades.  As I am gradually adding to my stash, I'd like to share some that have stood out with me and my students.

A great fairy tale to teach the influence of setting

An excellent fairy tale to teach point of view

A great fairy tale to teach the influence of setting

A fun fairy tale that is great for character changes

An excellent fairy tale to teach point of view

Not only are these fairy tales loads of fun to read and discuss, but there are tons of great comprehension activities you can do with your class.  

*Talk about the influence of setting
*Point of view activities
*Hold "court" for the villains in the story (after hearing their side)
*Character changes
*Opinion writing
*Persuasive writing

Read Write Think offers a huge variety of activities for using fractured fairy tales.  They offer great suggestions for students in grades K-10.


In addition, I created an organizer to compare and contrast different versions of the fairy tales.

A free organizer to compare fairy tales

You can download this organizer here.

I'd love to here from you.  What is your favorite fractured fairy tale?

Thank you, and have a great week!

Back to Top